AminoTrace+

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AminoTrace+ is designed to provide the ultimate nutrition for improved hoof quality, absorption of nutrients and improved digestion - all in a convenient pelleted format. When a custom formula is not possible or practical, AminoTrace+ is an excellent choice to balance your IR/Cushing's/PPID equine companions diet.  Not just for metabolic horses, AminoTrace+ is an excellent choice to fortify any horse's diet.
* Based on a 500 kg (1100 lb) horse at a feeding rate of 200 grams per day
AminoTrace+ Supports:
  • Metabolic Health
  • Mineral Balance
  • Tail, Mane and Hair Growth
  • Insulin Sensitivity
  • PPID/Cushing’s Horses
  • Hoof Growth and Structure
  • Antioxidant Defense
  • Digestion and Nutrient Absorption
  • Hindgut Health

Mad Barn’s AminoTrace+ is a comprehensive mineral and vitamin supplement designed to provide the ultimate nutrition for improved metabolic health, hoof quality and nutrient absorption.

AminoTrace+ was formulated specifically to ECIR group specifications to support equine companions with Insulin Resistance (IR), Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) and/or Cushing’s Disease/Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID).

Instead of purchasing many additional supplements to balance your forage, Mad Barn makes it easy to care for your IR horse with AminoTrace+.

The super-concentrated, pelleted formula correctly balances a wide range of forages and supplies the nutrients that your horse needs to combat inflammation, restore mineral balance and improve digestive health – no additional supplements needed!

Is your horse a fussy eater? AminoTrace+ is formulated to be palatable so that getting the appropriate nutrition into your equine companion is easier than trying to balance it with a bunch of unpalatable powders. This product contains no added sugars and only low NSC ingredients are used to pellet.

 

Robust Hooves From the Inside Out

Balanced mineral and vitamin nutrition creates the foundation for healthy hoof growth, especially for horses that have been diagnosed with metabolic conditions such as IR, EMD or PPID.

AminoTrace+ contains optimal levels of amino acids, minerals and vitamins to support healthy hoof growth, when accompanied with adequate forage.

  • Copper and Zinc work inside the enzymes that crosslink collagen and elastin together in connective tissue to form the proteins that make up the hoof.  High levels to balance high iron forages and water
  • Biotin has been clinically proven to improve hoof quality when given to horses at 20 mg per day.
  • Amino acids are the building blocks of protein needed to synthesize skin, hair and hooves. Lysine, methionine and threonine are considered to be the three most limiting amino acids in equine nutrition.
Incorporate AminoTrace+ into your horse’s diet and you will begin to see improvements in hoof growth, coat sheen, hair strength and more!

Everything Your Horse Needs For Healthy Metabolism

Insulin Resistant and/or PPID horses have special needs when it comes to vitamins and minerals. Ensuring that these are balanced in sufficient quantities in your horse’s diet will help build antioxidant defenses and combat inflammation.

Balanced Minerals

  • Enhanced copper and zinc levels in AminoTrace+ counteract high iron forages and bring ratios into correct balance.
  • A low iron phosphorus source limits the iron content of the supplement.

Essential Amino Acids

  • Added lysine, methionine and threonine ensure optimal protein synthesis, leading to improved top line, muscling, hoof growth, and immunity.

Advanced Trace Mineral Technology (ATMT)

The trace minerals found in AminoTrace+ are in the same form found in nature- attached to amino acids or peptides, to ensure:

  • Less interference with digestive processes. When compared to inorganic trace minerals, digestive enzyme activity is higher when using organic minerals (ATMT).
  • Less interference with other minerals. Is your hay high in iron? No need to worry- ATMT avoids mineral-mineral interactions that would inhibit absorption.

Powerful Antioxidants

  • Natural Source Vitamin E
    • Potent antioxidant that combats inflammation, maintains cell membrane integrity and enhances immunity.
    • All D-form isomer, the biologically active form of vitamin E.
    • Pelleted in an oil emulsion to enhance absorption.
  • Copper, Zinc, Manganese & Selenium
    • Important antioxidant minerals that are deficient in most hays.
    • ATMT enhances the utilization of Copper, Zinc, & Selenium, so you can ensure that your horse is getting the minerals that are most bioavailable.
  • Magnesium
    • Helps protect against inflammation and free-radical damage.
    • If magnesium is low in the cell, carbohydrate metabolism is impaired and a reduced insulin response can be triggered. AminoTrace+ contains high levels of readily bioavailable magnesium.

You should always consult a qualified nutritionist before altering your feed program. Submit your horse’s diet for analysis online and one of our equine nutritionists will be happy to provide a complementary review.

Biotin (Vitamin B7)2019-11-09T07:31:03-05:00

BiotinBiotin, also known as Vitamin B7, is a water-soluble B-vitamin that plays an important role as an enzymatic cofactor in metabolism. Most notably, biotin is involved in the enzymatic reactions that synthesize keratin, which is a component of skin, hair and hooves.

Horses are not capable of synthesizing biotin, and so it must be obtained from the diet. Outright deficiency is rare as biotin is found in most common feedstuffs. Dietary sources of biotin vary, with fresh pasture and alfalfa being the top sources, followed by oats, barley, soybean meal, corn and molasses.

Because it is present in such small quantities in most feedstuffs, the supplementation of biotin is recommended for horses, especially those with dry, cracked or brittle hooves, horses that pull shoes often or horses with chronic laminitis.

Adding biotin to a well-balanced diet can improve hoof health by producing strong keratin. Biotin supplementation has been shown to improve conditions such as brittle hoof horn and chipped hooves. In addition, it contributes to a healthy coat.

Research on the supplementation of pure biotin in equine diets has resulted in mostly positive results, mainly when looking at hoof growth rates, and it is widely advised that biotin be supplemented at 20 mg per day in order to see substantial improvements in hoof growth.

Calcium2020-02-05T11:35:06-05:00

CalciumCalcium is a macromineral with well described roles in bones and teeth development in horses. Calcium and phosphorus are usually discussed together because bones store them in a 2:1 ratio of calcium-to-phosphorus. This ratio should also be attained in the diet.

While most of the calcium found in the horse’s body is in bone tissue, this mineral is also involved in certain enzymatic functions, cell membrane function, muscle contractions and blood coagulation. Calcium ions mobilized from bone are also important for transmitting nerve impulses.

Young horses, growing horses, lactating mares and late-gestation broodmares all have higher calcium requirements than typical adult horses. Severe calcium deficiency in horses causing noticeable symptoms such as “big head” is less common today than in the past. However, deficiency may occur when horses consume certain subtropical grasses that are high in oxalate which restricts calcium absorption.

Cobalamin (Vitamin B12)2019-12-03T13:26:00-05:00

Vitamin B12Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) is a water-soluble vitamin with important roles in the nervous system, liver function, energy metabolism and red blood cell maturation. As a dietary supplement, it is sometimes given to horses to fight symptoms of fatigue and stress or to address digestive problems.

The horse needs cobalamin to ensure normal production of red blood cells in bone marrow, to maintain a healthy reproductive system and to support myelination of nerve pathways. Vitamin B12 is also involved in the metabolism of lipids (fats) and amino acids. This vitamin is said to improve physical stamina and to stimulate the appetite in horses.

Unlike other B-Complex vitamins, B12 is not produced naturally within plants and cannot be gained through the horse’s diet. Instead, it must be synthesized within the horse’s hindgut through bacterial fermentation from the mineral cobalt. While deficiency is rare, there may be times when providing additional Cobalamin by way of supplements can improve well-being.

Cobalt2019-11-09T07:32:53-05:00

CobaltCobalt is a micromineral that is required within the horse’s hindgut to synthesize the vitamin cobalamin (Vitamin B12). Microbes present in the hindgut convert cobalt into its active form cyanocobalamin by way of fermentation.

Cyanocobalamin is required for red blood cell formation, protein synthesis, carbohydrate and fat metabolism, reproductive function, cardiovascular health and the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Racehorses will sometimes supplement with additional sources of Cobalamin for a purported boost in athletic performance.

The essential trace mineral Cobalt is found naturally in horse feeds and there have not been any reported cases of deficiency. Signs of inadequate intake can include loss of appetite, anemia, poor growth, lethargy and other symptoms associated with low vitamin B12 consumption.

Some sources report that supplementation is necessary in regions where the soil does not naturally contain adequate amounts such as Florida, New England, Australia, New Zealand, and Norway. As a supplement, it is commonly provided in the form of Vitamin B12 or cobalt carbonate and it has a Max Tolerable Level of 25 mg/kg total dietary concentration.

Copper2023-06-12T17:58:23-04:00

CopperCopper is a micromineral that is required by the horse for proper nervous system function, antioxidant defense, cardiac function, bone development, cellular respiration, keratinization, tissue pigmentation and the formation of connective tissue. It is a catalytic co-factor for many important enzymes, meaning that it is required for these enzyme’s activity as a catalyst.

If copper levels are not adequate in the horse’s diet, it can lead to pigmentation abnormalities, sensitive skin, sluggishness, bone demineralization, osteoporosis, arthritis, liver problems, digestive problems, anemia, neutropenia, or leukopenia. Deficiency may be common in certain geographic regions where soil content is naturally low in copper.

Absorption of this mineral from the gastrointestinal tract is between 5 to 10% in adults and may be reduced during times of disease or if the horse is consuming a diet high in phytates or competing minerals. To increase levels, a highly bioavailable form of this mineral like Bioplex Copper (copper proteinate) is recommended.

Flax Oil2019-11-09T10:19:03-05:00

Flax OilFlax oil is a plant oil that is extracted from flaxseed and has the highest concentration of Omega-3 fatty acids of all of the plant oils. Because of its high Omega-3 concentration, palatable taste and wide availability, flax oil is one of the most common Omega-3 fatty acid and energy supplements in horse nutrition.

In addition to Omega-3 fatty acids, Omega-6 fatty acids are also found in flax oil. The combination of Omega-3 and Omega-6 is of particular interest in horse nutrition because of the positive effects they have on inflammation, immunity and cardiovascular health.

Horses are not able to produce Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids themselves, so they must be consumed in the diet, and flax oil is a great choice. Horses may require the addition of fat to their diet to increase dietary calorie density and assist in fighting inflammation, but it can also be used to add a healthy gloss to the hair coat. This might require as little as 80-120 mL of oil per day, up to 500 mL. As with all dietary changes, the addition of supplemental fats in the form of plant oils should be done slowly to allow the horse’s gastrointestinal tract to acclimatize.

Folic Acid (Vitamin B9)2019-11-09T07:32:40-05:00

Folic AcidFolic Acid (folate, Vitamin B9) is a water-soluble vitamin that is involved in DNA synthesis, methionine production and cellular growth and development. It is particularly important for supporting cell turnover during periods of rapid growth such as fetal development, tissue repair and regeneration of cells lining the intestinal wall.

Folic acid is sometimes given to horses to improve hemoglobin levels because of its role in maintaining healthy red blood cells. Deficiency in folate can manifest as megaloblastic anemia, but this has only ever been reported in other species and not in horses.

Folic acid is generally supplied in adequate amounts in the horse’s diet, especially for animals on pasture or those with access to fresh forage, alfalfa, timothy hay and cereal grains. Horses fed hay tend to have lower levels of this vitamin in their blood.

Horses currently being treated with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine for EPM may require supplemental folic acid because these medications interfere with the absorption of this vitamin from the gastrointestinal tract.

Iodine2019-12-06T11:07:46-05:00

IodineIodine is a trace mineral that is essential for normal thyroid function and metabolism in the horse. Iodine is require to synthesize the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) which regulate metabolism in every cell in the body.

Horses that do not obtain enough of this mineral from their diet are at risk of developing goiter or an enlarged thyroid gland. Other signs of low iodine include hypothyroid symptoms such as hair loss or rough coat, flaky skin, retarded growth, muscle weakness, low temperature, lethargy and brittle hooves.

Iodine content in the diet varies across geographic regions depending on how much of this mineral is naturally found in the soil. The 2007 Nutrient Requirements of Horses guidelines published by the NRC stipulate that horses need at least 3.5-4.5 mg of dietary iodine per day, although some horses with heavy work loads or breeding or lactating mares may require more. Iodized salt blocks are typically used to supplement levels of this mineral in horses. Kelp and other seaweeds are also good sources.

Lysine2019-11-09T07:24:58-05:00